Bone grafting

Bone grafting

Bone grafting

Bone grafting is a surgical procedure that places new bone or a replacement material into spaces between or around broken bone (fractures) or in holes in bone (defects) to aid in healing. There are lots of things that affect the bone volume including periodontal disease, trauma and infections, and it is not unusual to open up a site in the mouth for implant placement and find out that some of the critical supporting bone is missing. Bone grafting will only take place after your dentist has assessed the quality and quantity of the bone in your jaw and found that there is not enough to continue with a dental implant.
There are four methods of bone grafting: Osteogenesis (new bone is formed by the cells that are contained in the graft), Osteoinduction (Acceleration of new bone formation by chemical means), and Osteoconduction (provision of a scaffold for the growth of new bone).

 

There are four types of bone grafting: Autografts (bone is taken from one area of the patients body and transplanted to another that requires grafting; usually the bone is harvested from the hip or from the mouth of the patient and grafted onto the patients jawbone. The compatibility of the jaw bone with the harvested bone from the patients body is high and this makes this technique most successful. It is the best grafting technique). Allografts are taken from the bone bank. Bone harvested in this manner goes through various sterilization techniques to ensure that it is safe as a graft. This donor bone will be finally converted as natural bone whilst building the jaw bone. Xenografts are harvested from animals. It acts like a "filler" which in time your body will replace with natural bone. After this replacement process is complete, dental implants may be placed to support teeth. Alloplastic grafts insert synthetic materials made by man. Most often inserted is a form of calcium phosphate. Depending on how it is made, it may be "resorbable" or "non-resorbable".

After a bone grafting procedure patients will feel swelling. It usually occurs 24-48 hours after the surgery. The oral surgeon may suggest pain relief medications, to minimise the pain after surgery.  Do not use a straw, drink from a glass. The sucking motion can cause more bleeding by dislodging the blood clot. You may eat anything soft by chewing away from the surgical site. Drink at least 5-6 glasses of water per day.

Today, we have the ability to grow bone where needed and to restore functionality and aesthetic appearance. After bone grafting surgery bed rest is recommended for one day and limited physical activity for one week.

 

Related articles.

Displaying 1 to 5 of 11

Oral surgery

Oral surgery is a practice that has been around for centuries. Oral surgery is a generic term for a number of different surgeries and procedures     First of all, keep in mind that the term "oral surgery" includes a lot more than just the mouth. It can also include the chin, upper .... read more

Bone grafting

Bone grafting Bone grafting is a surgical procedure that places new bone or a replacement material into spaces between or around broken bone (fractures) or in holes in bone (defects) to aid in healing. There are lots of things that affect the bone volume including periodontal disease, trauma and .... read more

Alveoplasty

Alveoplasty is the name of the surgery by which the jawbone is smoothed out after the extraction of one or more teeth. After the extraction of a tooth, the jawbone in the extraction area possesses uneven points. These high and low points in the jawbone cause discomfort to the individual. These may c .... read more

Apicectomy

The roots of the teeth extend to the jawbone and effectively hold the teeth. Frontal teeth have generally one root, while premolars and molars have two or more roots. The end or tip of the root of the tooth is called apex. The apex is the location from where the blood vessels and nerves enter the to .... read more

Bone cysts

Bone cysts are cysts which can exist on the bone of any part of the body or particularly the jaw. There are three types of bone cysts; simple bone cysts, aneurysmal bone cysts and traumatic bone cysts. A small or simple bone cyst is relatively common and it is a fluid containing lesion or cavity in .... read more


Oral Health by Regions

     

Oral Health Knowledge Base

     

Glossary