Root Canal Therapy

Root Canal Therapy

Root canal treatment (also called Endodontics) is needed when the pulp inside your tooth becomes infected through tooth decay or damaged by an injury to your mouth. This infection may spread through the root canal system, which could eventually lead to an abscess, causing a great deal of discomfort.

The infection is caused by bacteria that live in the mouth and invade the tooth. This can happen after several things, including tooth decay, leaky fillings and trauma to the teeth like a fall or other accident.

Tooth structure

A tooth is made up of two parts. The crown is the part of the tooth that's visible in the mouth. The root extends into the bone of the jaw, anchoring the tooth in position.

The root canal system contains the dental pulp and extends from the crown of the tooth to the end of the root. A single tooth can have more than one root canal.

Infection

The pulp is made up of soft tissue that includes nerves and blood vessels. The pulp will begin to die if it's infected by bacteria. Bacteria can then multiply and spread.

The bacteria and the substances they release will eventually pass out of the end of the root canal through the small hole where the blood vessels and nerves enter.

This process will continue because there's nothing to stop more bacteria passing down the root canal, which causes the tissues around the end of the tooth to become red and swollen. This can make your tooth painful and, in extreme cases, your face may become swollen (known as a dental abscess).

 

The procedure

To treat the infection in the root canal, the bacteria need to be removed. This can be done by either extracting the tooth or or removing the bacteria from the root canal system.After the bacteria have been removed, the root canal will be filled and the tooth sealed with a filling or crown. In most cases, the inflamed tissue at the end of the tooth will heal naturally.

Before having root canal treatment, you will usually be given a local anaesthetic. This means the procedure shouldn't be painful, and should be no more unpleasant than having a filling.

 

Root canal treatment is usually successful. In about 9 out of 10 cases, a tooth can survive for up to 10 years after root canal treatment.

Aftercare

It's important to look after your teeth when recovering from root canal treatment.

Avoid biting on hard foods until all of your treatment is complete.

In most cases, it's possible to prevent the need for further root canal treatment by maintaining good, consistent oral hygiene, not consuming too much sugary food and drink and long term, by quitting smoking if applicable.


Related articles.

Displaying 11 to 15 of 289

Why is Dental Hygiene so Important?

The concept of dental hygiene is familiar. We all know exactly how important it is to avoid consuming excess amounts of sugary foods and drinks, to brush our teeth twice daily and use mouthwash and floss regularly to avoid excess build-up of tartar and plaque. Some people learn the hard way through experience, but others take on board the advice and follow it. Despite the advances in dentistry and treatment, tooth decay remains one of the most widespread health problems in the UK with up to an estimated 31% of adults suffering. Therefore, it is clear that the knowledge of what to do doesn’t tell us why we need to do it.

.... read more

Dental hygiene – is it worth it?

Or perhaps more accurately we should be asking – how long do you want to keep your teeth for?

Finances are tricky for most people ordinarily and certainly so in today’s tough economy. However most people continue to respond to the consumer-orientated environment and prioritise their money for the things or activities that they particularly enjoy. Therefore, they are looking to cut back on the things which they don’t deem so important. Sadly, a visit to the hygienist seems to be one of those things which people find easy to cut out. The consequences of this are widely either misunderstood or ignored.

 

.... read more

Your Guide to E-Cigarettes and Oral Health

Since they emerged on the market back in 2007 Electronic cigarettes have slowly risen in popularity. With many smokers making the switch from traditional cigarettes to decrease their harmful side effects, E-cigarettes are branded as the cheaper, socially acceptable and even healthier alternative. So, are E-cigarettes a safer option for the traditional smoker? How exactly do they affect oral health?

 
.... read more

5 Tips to Better Oral Health

Good oral health is about so much more than a pearly white smile. Not only does it help eradicate cavities and reduce plaque, it can benefit our overall health too.  Keep reading for five top tips about everything you need to know about oral care. 
 
 
.... read more

Direct Access Has Been Granted to all Dental Hygienists

Nowadays, the barrier for direct access against all dental hygienist has been removed. This decision had been made final due to the realization of its effect to patient’s safety. In the previous years, each member of the dental team was obliged to work under the supervision of a dentist. It only means that patients should meet the dentist first before they can be treated by other members of the group.

.... read more

Oral Health by Regions

     

Oral Health Knowledge Base

     

Glossary